Poetry: Babble and Doodle

28 Jan

Read the following two poems. Which senses are they appealing too?

Put Put
By Carl Leggo

put put put put put put put put
FUMP fump FUP fump FUMP fump FUMP
shash splu shash splu shash splu
splu shash splu shash splu shash
sous LLOP sous LLOP sous LLOP sous
llop SOUS llop SOUS llop SOUS llop
nat nat nat nat nat nat nat nat nat

TASK: This is a sound poem, based upon the engine of a Newfoundland fishing boat. Write your own sound poem by imagining the sounds in a location: 

  • A busy street
  • The kitchen during breakfast
  • A snowstorm
  • a sandstorm
  • clocks
  • Something else?

Now look at an example of concrete poetry.

Take off

Task: Describe how the visuals emphasise the ideas of the poem. Be specific; connect words to what is happening (write one complete paragraph). 

When reading poetry, you might have noticed that poets often appeal to two senses the most: sound and sight, or we can call it babble and doodle. So we can say:

Babble are the words and sounds that appeal to the sense of hearing eg. rhyme, rhythm, soft and hard sounds

Doodle are the words and phrases that appeal to the sense of sight eg. shape, structure, images and comparisons.  Notice that there are two kinds of “doodles”; one that is on the page (like concrete poetry) and the other that encourages an image in the mind of the reader.

Lets have a look at how a poet uses these two techniques together. You have already read “Bird in the Classroom” by Colin Thiele. Read it again.

 

 

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