The Class Structure in the Victorian Era

9 Mar

The Victorian era was during the period of the rule of Queen Victoria. During that period many things flourished such as the school and political or religious movements. During that time Britain consists of four classes: the Church, the aristocracy, the middle class and the working class. The top class such as the aristocracy class possessed the greatest power and wealth. Most of the people in this class structure were noble men and owned most of the land. The royal family was also part of this class structure. The people in the middle class were not much privileged. Some of the people in this class structure were rich. This type of class comprises of factory owners, bankers, shopkeepers, merchants, lawyers, engineers, businessmen, traders, and other professionals. The lower class had two sections which were: the working class which consisted of labors and the poor people. The lower class consisted of women and children performing different types of labor such as working in a factory, sewing, chimney sweeping, mining and other jobs. The aristocratic class didn’t have to pay the taxes during that time. On the other hand, the middle class and the poorer class had the most burden of tax. Industrialization completely changed the class structure especially the middle class which is the working class. As a result of the industrialization, it created a huge division between the upper class and the lower class. The classes were distinct because the upper class had a higher income and much greater status and they had higher esteem. On the other hand, the lower class didn’t possess any of those things because they were in poverty.

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