Looking at Perspective

7 Feb

Looking at the perspective of other characters in a story can highlight motive’s, thoughts, feelings and emotions. Equally, writing historical stories from a different point-of-view can create empathy for characters and people who we normally wouldn’t feel for. Boyne creates this empathy in The Boy in the Striped Pajamas by writing from the perspective of a German child in World War II.

Task: For this task, you have two options:

  1. Add event to The Boy in the Striped Pajamas that would realistically happen to Bruno. Your event should include some dialogue between Bruno and Schmuel.
  2. Re-write a fairytale or other children’s story from the perspective of the antagonist. Mimic Maguire’s style by making sure your audience feels empathy for this character i.e. How could we change The Three Little Pigs so that we feel empathy for the wolf?

Product: in both options, the main part of the task is to create a visual plan of how your story will unfold. This could take the form of a plot diagram, linear chain of events, storyboard or some other visual representation of the plot you intend to create. At each point you should have a description of what is occurring in the story. You should also make it clear which events add empathy for your characters (i.e. Explain the things the character does or says).

Option 1: along with your visual plan, you must also include a 200-300 word passage of dialogue/description as it would appear in the story. Mimic Boyne’s style by including some  of the features of writing we studied to make his writing sound like it comes from a child.

Option 2: Along with your visual plan, you must also include a 100-200 word passage of dialogue description as it would appear in the published story. Think about features of writing that will encourage your audience to feel empathy for the main character and show this in your writing.

 

You work will be assessed using criterion A and B.

 

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